Yukon

Yukon

I spent summer 2020 in the Yukon living with my brother after losing my job to COVID-19. What started off as a last resort solution to save my summer from being a disaster ended up being one of the coolest, most unique experiences of my life. I went from being locked inside an apartment 24/7 in Montréal to going camping every weekend, picking wild mushrooms on a remote river for five weeks and traveling down BC and Alberta for a month. 

Many people have never heard of the Yukon – even some of my fellow Canadian friends had no idea where I was headed when I first told them about my summer plans. And it’s possibly what makes the Yukon so fun and unique : it’s remote, its vast, and aside from its capital city (Whitehorse), it’s pretty much devoid of any human presence. If you’re an outdoor enthusiast, chances are you’ll be thrilled by everything the Yukon has to offer. 

If you’re looking into visiting the Yukon, plan ahead – it can be difficult to explore if you don’t know the area very well. Since so few people live there, there are very few roads to get you places, and a 4WD vehicle or a boat will often be necessary to get you to more secluded areas. I unfortunately couldn’t cross into Alaska because of the COVID-19 border restrictions, but I was told repeatedly that a road trip there is mandatory if you find yourself up here and have enough time on your hands. 

If you wish to purchase one of the pictures below, click here. Most of the pictures on this page were taken with a NikonD500 and are available at a size up to 4×5 feet. 

I spent summer 2020 in the Yukon living with my brother after losing my job to COVID-19. What started off as a last resort solution to save my summer from being a disaster ended up being one of the coolest, most unique experiences of my life. I went from being locked inside an apartment 24/7 in Montréal to going camping every weekend, picking wild mushrooms on a remote river for five weeks and traveling down BC and Alberta for a month. 

Many people have never heard of the Yukon – even some of my fellow Canadian friends had no idea where I was headed when I first told them about my summer plans. And it’s possibly what makes the Yukon so fun and unique : it’s remote, its vast, and aside from its capital city (Whitehorse), it’s pretty much devoid of any human presence. If you’re an outdoor enthusiast, chances are you’ll be thrilled by everything the Yukon has to offer. 

If you’re looking into visiting the Yukon, plan ahead – it can be difficult to explore if you don’t know the area very well. Since so few people live there, there are very few roads to get you places, and a 4WD vehicle or a boat will often be necessary to get you to more secluded areas. I unfortunately couldn’t cross into Alaska because of the COVID-19 border restrictions, but I was told repeatedly that a road trip there is mandatory if you find yourself up here and have enough time on your hands. 

If you wish to purchase one of the pictures below, click here. Most of the pictures on this page were taken with a NikonD500 and are available at a size up to 4×5 feet. 

Northern Yukon

I visited the Yukon in the summer and therefore experienced 24/7 daylight when I spent the month of June picking mushrooms on the Stewart River near Dawson City. Long days means tons of time to do tons of things, which is great when you’re visiting for a week or two. 

The most epic place I’ve had the chance to visit in the Yukon is without a doubt Tombstone Territorial Park, which is located roughly an hour and a half north of Dawson City (which is also a must see). I visited in late August to get the colorful fall foliage and hiked the famous Grizzly Lake trail for 4 days. It ain’t an easy hike and you must prepare for anything including snow in the middle of July but trust me, it’s worth going through hell if you have to in order to see it with your own eyes. 

There is so much more I want to see and do in Northern Yukon that I am sure I will be back in the near future. My advice to anyone visiting the area is to bring a friend, pack a good waterproof tent, some swim shorts and a winter jacket, and hit the road for as long as you can – you won’t be disappointed. 

I visited the Yukon in the summer and therefore experienced 24/7 daylight when I spent the month of June picking mushrooms on the Stewart River near Dawson City. Long days means tons of time to do tons of things, which is great when you’re visiting for a week or two. 

The most epic place I’ve had the chance to visit in the Yukon is without a doubt Tombstone Territorial Park, which is located roughly an hour and a half north of Dawson City (which is also a must see). I visited in late August to get the colorful fall foliage and hiked the famous Grizzly Lake trail for 4 days. It ain’t an easy hike and you must prepare for anything including snow in the middle of July but trust me, it’s worth going through hell if you have to in order to see it with your own eyes. 

There is so much more I want to see and do in Northern Yukon that I am sure I will be back in the near future. My advice to anyone visiting the area is to bring a friend, pack a good waterproof tent, some swim shorts and a winter jacket, and hit the road for as long as you can – you won’t be disappointed. 

Southern Yukon

Unless you’re visiting from Alaska, your first stop in the Yukon will likely be Whitehorse, the territory’s capital city. Unlike what many people think, you can actually find pretty much anything in Whitehorse. From there, you can start an epic road trip in virtually any direction. There are countless gorgeous lakes to paddle on, incredible trails to hike on, scenic roads to drive on, and so on. I have never been in the Yukon in the winter so I can’t give any advice on winter activities, but I can guarantee you that you’ll always find a way to keep yourself busy on Yukon’s very long summer days. 

Unless you’re visiting from Alaska, your first stop in the Yukon will likely be Whitehorse, the territory’s capital city. Unlike what many people think, you can actually find pretty much anything in Whitehorse. From there, you can start an epic road trip in virtually any direction. There are countless gorgeous lakes to paddle on, incredible trails to hike on, scenic roads to drive on, and so on. I have never been in the Yukon in the winter so I can’t give any advice on winter activities, but I can guarantee you that you’ll always find a way to keep yourself busy on Yukon’s very long summer days.