British Columbia

I spent a month driving around the west coast of Canada in the summer of 2020 and was swept off my feet by all the beautiful places I visited on my trip. There is so much more to BC than I expected – from the Rockies to the ocean, from busy Vancouver to the remote wilderness of the north, every corner of the province was so much fun to explore. 

Virtually everyone has heard about Vancouver, the perfect place to start a BC road trip, whether it’s by cruising to Vancouver Island or heading east to the Rockies. I wish I could give you highlights but I couldn’t pick a favorite spot – I had amazing weather from start to finish and was therefore able to get the most out of every hike, every beach and every bike ride I went on. I hope you find some inspiration for an upcoming west coast road trip in my photos!

If you wish to purchase one of the pictures below, click here. Most of the pictures on this page were taken with a NikonD500 and are available at a size up to 4×5 feet. 

I spent a month driving around the west coast of Canada in the summer of 2020 and was swept off my feet by all the beautiful places I visited on my trip. There is so much more to BC than I expected – from the Rockies to the ocean, from busy Vancouver to the remote wilderness of the north, every corner of the province was so much fun to explore. 

Virtually everyone has heard about Vancouver, the perfect place to start a BC road trip, whether it’s by cruising to Vancouver Island or heading east to the Rockies. I wish I could give you highlights but I couldn’t pick a favorite spot – I had amazing weather from start to finish and was therefore able to get the most out of every hike, every beach and every bike ride I went on. I hope you find some inspiration for an upcoming west coast road trip in my photos!

If you wish to purchase one of the pictures below, click here. Most of the pictures on this page were taken with a NikonD500 and are available at a size up to 4×5 feet. 

Assiniboine

Assiniboine Provincial Park is right by Banff National Park across the BC/Alberta border and, just like most parks in the area, offers countless hiking trails to explore. The most famous of them all is probably the Magog Lake trail that stretches for 60+ km with over 2000m elevation gain from Sunshine to Mount Shark trailhead.

Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic and last minute cancellations from international travelers, I was able to book 3 nights at the Magog Lake campground – something you’d normally have to do months in advance if you wished to hike the trail. Because of COVID, the Sunshine resort gondolas were closed for the season, which meant I had to hike an additional 7 km with an extra 600m elevation gain. It was all worth the effort though, as the Magog Lake area was possibly my favorite camping spot ever – tied with Kalalau Beach in Hawaii – and offered countless day hikes options to explore the area. I got extremely lucky and had 5 days of wall-to-wall sunshine and 30+ degrees weather which made the hiking difficult but also made swimming in Magog lake possible to cool off in the afternoon. Swimming in a glacier lake with such an iconic backdrop was something I’ll forever remember – and I hope every hiking enthusiast who reads this will get a chance to hike that iconic trail one day. 

PHOTOS COMING SOON!

Assiniboine Provincial Park is right by Banff National Park across the BC/Alberta border and, just like most parks in the area, offers countless hiking trails to explore. The most famous of them all is probably the Magog Lake trail that stretches for 60+ km with over 2000m elevation gain from Sunshine to Mount Shark trailhead.

Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic and last minute cancellations from international travelers, I was able to book 3 nights at the Magog Lake campground – something you’d normally have to do months in advance if you wished to hike the trail. Because of COVID, the Sunshine resort gondolas were closed for the season, which meant I had to hike an additional 7 km with an extra 600m elevation gain. It was all worth the effort though, as the Magog Lake area was possibly my favorite camping spot ever – tied with Kalalau Beach in Hawaii – and offered countless day hikes options to explore the area. I got extremely lucky and had 5 days of wall-to-wall sunshine and 30+ degrees weather which made the hiking difficult but also made swimming in Magog lake possible to cool off in the afternoon. Swimming in a glacier lake with such an iconic backdrop was something I’ll forever remember – and I hope every hiking enthusiast who reads this will get a chance to hike that iconic trail one day. 

PHOTOS COMING SOON!

Yoho

If you somehow find yourself out of things to do or places to see in Banff and/or Jasper, check out Yoho National Park, which is conveniently located less than an hour away from Banff. I’m sure the park has a lot more to offer than the couple of places I visited, but I spent so much time hiking in Assiniboine, Banff and Jasper that I didn’t have much time left for Yoho. However, I definitely recommend checking out Emerald Lake, a less crowded Lake Louise / Lake Morraine where I hung my hammock for an afternoon. Swimming and kayaking are possible there and since you can park along the road, there’s pretty much unlimited parking if you’re willing to walk a little to get to the lake. 

PHOTOS COMING SOON!

If you somehow find yourself out of things to do or places to see in Banff and/or Jasper, check out Yoho National Park, which is conveniently located less than an hour away from Banff. I’m sure the park has a lot more to offer than the couple of places I visited, but I spent so much time hiking in Assiniboine, Banff and Jasper that I didn’t have much time left for Yoho. However, I definitely recommend checking out Emerald Lake, a less crowded Lake Louise / Lake Morraine where I hung my hammock for an afternoon. Swimming and kayaking are possible there and since you can park along the road, there’s pretty much unlimited parking if you’re willing to walk a little to get to the lake. 

PHOTOS COMING SOON!

Vancouver

For as long as I can remember I’ve always wanted to visit Vancouver, but the astronomical prices kept me away from making it happen until I stopped there on my way from Banff to the Vancouver Island. I don’t find Vancouver – the downtown area, that is – particularly photogenic and therefore haven’t photographed it much during my stay.

What’s so great about Vancouver is that while there’s a lot going on in the city and it can get pretty busy, you’re only a few kilometres away from countless hikes, parks, ski resorts, lakes and rivers, as well as being right by the Pacific ocean. That means you can start your day biking through a jungle of skyscrapers, have lunch on top of a mountain and lay down on a beach to watch the sunset. 

After stopping in Vancouver for three days, I spent a whole week driving around Vancouver Island and finally got to see some of the places I had been told about a million times by friends. Highlights? Brunch in Victoria, a night camping under the stars at Mystic Beach, swimming in Nanaimo River and hiking the 5040 Peak near Tofino. I feel like I’ve seen very little of that gigantic island, but it doesn’t worry me too much since I am convinced I will head back there in no time. 

PHOTOS COMING SOON!

For as long as I can remember I’ve always wanted to visit Vancouver, but the astronomical prices kept me away from making it happen until I stopped there on my way from Banff to the Vancouver Island. I don’t find Vancouver – the downtown area, that is – particularly photogenic and therefore haven’t photographed it much during my stay.

What’s so great about Vancouver is that while there’s a lot going on in the city and it can get pretty busy, you’re only a few kilometres away from countless hikes, parks, ski resorts, lakes and rivers, as well as being right by the Pacific ocean. That means you can start your day biking through a jungle of skyscrapers, have lunch on top of a mountain and lay down on a beach to watch the sunset. 

After stopping in Vancouver for three days, I spent a whole week driving around Vancouver Island and finally got to see some of the places I had been told about a million times by friends. Highlights? Brunch in Victoria, a night camping under the stars at Mystic Beach, swimming in Nanaimo River and hiking the 5040 Peak near Tofino. I feel like I’ve seen very little of that gigantic island, but it doesn’t worry me too much since I am convinced I will head back there in no time. 

PHOTOS COMING SOON!

Northern BC

Starting and ending my west coast road trip in Whitehorse, I drove both routes linking the Yukon capital to BC – the Alaska Highway on my way to Jasper and the Stewart Cassiar Highway on my way back from Vancouver. Both routes are very scenic – and very remote – and take more or less the same time if you’re transiting through Prince George.

The Alaska Highway is well-trafficked and four-season and takes you through gorgeous valleys where you’re guaranteed to see a ton of wildlife (most noticeably gigantic bisons walking along the road). There are several campsites along the way and if you find yourself in trouble for whatever reason, it’s very likely that a car will pass by within an hour at any given time. I’d recommend that route if you’re only traveling to or from Whitehorse one way. 

The Stewart Cassiar is the most remote route I’ve ever driven on – nearly 800 km with only a couple of gas stations here and there. I found the road to be in great condition considering how unused it is – aside from the giant mudslide that forced a road closure for 2 days as I was driving up – and I liked finding myself in the absolute middle of nowhere for a bit. I stayed at the Meziadin Crossing campground for a night and had a visit from a black bear and a grizzly bear eating berries right on my campsite, which was kind of cool! I heard that driving the Cassiar in the winter is a terrible idea as the road isn’t maintained and there’s very little traffic, meaning that if your car breaks down you could go for hours without anyone driving by to help. 

PHOTOS COMING SOON!

Starting and ending my west coast road trip in Whitehorse, I drove both routes linking the Yukon capital to BC – the Alaska Highway on my way to Jasper and the Stewart Cassiar Highway on my way back from Vancouver. Both routes are very scenic – and very remote – and take more or less the same time if you’re transiting through Prince George.

The Alaska Highway is well-trafficked and four-season and takes you through gorgeous valleys where you’re guaranteed to see a ton of wildlife (most noticeably gigantic bisons walking along the road). There are several campsites along the way and if you find yourself in trouble for whatever reason, it’s very likely that a car will pass by within an hour at any given time. I’d recommend that route if you’re only traveling to or from Whitehorse one way. 

The Stewart Cassiar is the most remote route I’ve ever driven on – nearly 800 km with only a couple of gas stations here and there. I found the road to be in great condition considering how unused it is – aside from the giant mudslide that forced a road closure for 2 days as I was driving up – and I liked finding myself in the absolute middle of nowhere for a bit. I stayed at the Meziadin Crossing campground for a night and had a visit from a black bear and a grizzly bear eating berries right on my campsite, which was kind of cool! I heard that driving the Cassiar in the winter is a terrible idea as the road isn’t maintained and there’s very little traffic, meaning that if your car breaks down you could go for hours without anyone driving by to help. 

PHOTOS COMING SOON!